It’s stunning what you learn about your iPhone while in holidays

I should go in holidays more often. You find out interesting things about your iPhone when you go outside the urban environment it was mostly designed for. I’m not ready to talk about the tests I mentioned earlier, but here’s a few other observations I can share…

First, the iPhone, or at the very least the iPhone 3GS which is the model I own, seems to have trouble getting a GPS fix in cloudy weather. If obtaining a location regardless of weather is of any real importance, a dedicated GPS device is still required.

Second, if you’re not going to have access to a power outlet for, say, one week, switch your device to airplane mode, it’s just as efficient and more practical than turning it off. Let me explain. I was for a week in remote parts of the Alps, trekking from mountain refuge to mountain refuge; even those that have some electricity from a generator are unlikely to have power outlets. Furthermore, in that environment you often don’t get any signal, or if you do it’s very weak, so a lot of battery is going to be wasted looking for a signal or maintaining a weak connection. So last year, I simply turned off my iPhone so as to conserve battery for the whole week. However, it was not very practical as I had to wait for it to boot each time I wanted to use it, which wasn’t very fast… So this year, I put it in airplane mode instead of turning it off. This turns off the radios and leaves it consuming apparently very little power; but it was ready much faster when I wanted to check whether there was any signal, or test my application, or show off something, and it still had juice at the end of the week.

Lastly, and this is more for developers: even if your app requires location, you may not always get true north if there is no data connection, so be sure to always handle the lack of true heading and fall back to the magnetic heading. As you know, a compass does not point exactly to the North Pole (in this context also referred to as geographic north), but to a point called the magnetic north pole, located somewhere in Greenland (in fact it is even more complicated than that, but let’s leave it at that). The iPhone 3GS and iPhone 4, both featuring a magnetometer, cannot give you true north using only that sensor any more than a compass can; however, if the device also has your location, it can apply the correction between magnetic north and true north directions at that point and give you the true north; this is well documented in the API documentation. However, while your location is necessary, it is not sufficient! I have observed that if I don’t have any data connection, I only get magnetic north, even if I just got a GPS fix; the device probably needs to query a remote database to get the magnetic north correction for a given point. So if your application uses heading in any way, never assume you can have true north, even if you know you have location; always handle the lack of true north and fall back to magnetic north in that case, mountain trekkers everywhere will thank you.