Steve

I wasn’t sure I should write something, at first. Oh, sure, I could have written about the fact I didn’t dress specially thursday morning or didn’t bring anything to an Apple Store, as I thought for Steve I should either do something in the most excellent taste or nothing, and I couldn’t think of the former (and so I kicked myself saturday when I went to the Opera Apple Store to buy a Lion USB key, saw them, and thought “Of course! An apple with a bite taken out of it… dummy!”). Or I could have written about the fact he was taken from his families at a way too early age. Or about the fact, except for this one (and variants of this one, though one would have been enough), I was appalled by the editorial cartoons about the event (“iDead”? Seriously?). Or about a few obituaries I read or heard where the author put some criticism along with the praise (which by itself I don’t mind, honestly, he was kind of a jerk), but put in a way that suggested the good could be kept without the flaws, while for instance in an industry where having different companies responsible for aspects of the user experience of a single device is considered standard practice, being a control freak is essential to ensure the quality of the user experience that has made Apple a success. Or about how his presence in the keynotes during his last leave of absence (while on the other hand he stepped back from presentation duties during the previous one), and his resignation merely 6 weeks ago, both take on a whole new meaning today.

But at the end of the day, what would have I brought, given the outpouring of tributes and other content about Steve Jobs, many from people more qualified and better writers than I am? Not much. However, I read a piece where the author acknowledges the impact Steve Jobs had on his life, and I thought I should, too, pay my dues and render unto Steve that which is Steve’s, if only to help with the cathartic process. I hope it will contribute something for his family, his family at Apple, his family at Disney/Pixar, and the whole tech and media industries in this time of grief.

I was quite literally raised with Apple computers; from an Apple ][e to the latest Macs, there has always been Apple (and only Apple) hardware in the house, for which I cannot thank my father enough. As a consequence, while I had no idea who Steve Jobs was at the time, he was already having a huge impact on me. Not because I think he designed these computers all by himself, but because, by demanding seemingly impossibly high standards from the ones who designed them with him, or in the case of later Macs, by having made enough of a mark at Apple that the effect was (almost) the same, he ensured a quality of user experience way beyond that of any competitor, which allowed my young self to do things he wouldn’t have been able to do otherwise, and teaching him to expect, nay, demand similar excellence from his computing devices.

Then I started learning about him when he returned to Apple in 1997, from a press cautiously optimistic that the “prodigal son” could get Apple out of trouble, then how he spectacularly did so. I indirectly learned from him (in particular through folklore.org) that it requires a great deal of effort to make something look simple, that there is never good enough, merely good enough to ship this once (because on the other hand, real artists ship) and that the job of the software developer is to be in service of the user experience, not to make stuff that is only of interest to other software developers and remain in a closed circuit.

Imagining my life had Steve Jobs not made what he made is almost too ludicrous to contemplate. Assuming I would even have chosen a career in programming, I would be developing mediocre software on systems that would be as usable a mid-nineties Macintosh, if that, and would have very little of the elegance (come on: setting aside any quibble about who copied whom, do you think Windows or any other operating system would be where it is today were it not for the Mac to at the very least compete with it and make it do one better in the usability department?). And the worst thing is that I would have been content with it and considered it as good as it gets, and it would have been the same for almost all of my peers.

It’s thus safe to say that as far as my influences go, Steve Jobs is second only to my closest family members. By envisioning the future, then making it happen through leadership, talent and just plain chutzpah (for good or ill, it doesn’t seem to be possible to make people believe in your predictions of what the future will be made of, other than by actually taking charge and realizing it), he showed us what computers (and portable music players, and mobile phones, etc.) could be rather than what most people thought they could be before he showed us. And by teaching a legion of users, multiple generations of developers, and everyone at Apple to never settle for great but always strive for the best, he has ensured the continuation of this ethic for a few decades, at least (this is, incidentally, the reason why I am not too worried about the future of Apple, Inc.).

Thank you Steve. Thank you for everything. See you at the crossroads.