MPW on Mac OS X

From Steven Troughton-Smith (via both Michael Tsai and John Gruber) comes the news of an MPW compatibility layer project and how to use it to build code targeting Classic Mac OS and even Carbonized code from a Mac OS X host, including Yosemite (10.10). This is quite clever, and awesome news, as doing so was becoming more and more complicated, and in practice required keeping one ore more old Macs around.

Back in the days of Mac OS X 10.2-10.4, I toyed with backporting some of my programming projects, originally developed in Carbon with Project Builder, to MacOS 9, and downloaded MPW (since it was free, and CodeWarrior was not) to do so. The Macintosh Programmer’s Workshop was Apple’s own development environment for developing Mac apps, tracing its lineage from the Lisa Programmer’s Workshop, which was originally the only way to develop Mac apps (yes, in 1984 you could not develop Mac software on the Mac itself). If I recall correctly, Apple originally had MPW for sale, before they made it free when it could no longer compete with CodeWarrior. You can still find elements from MPW in the form of a few tools in today’s Xcode — mostly Rez, DeRez, GetFileInfo and SetFile. As a result, I do have some advice when backporting code from Mac OS X to MacOS 9 (and possibly earlier, as Steven demonstrated).

First, you of course have to forget about Objective-C, forget about any modern Carbon (e.g. HIObject, though the Carbon Event Manager is OK), forget about Quartz (hello QuickDraw), forget about most of Unix, though if I recall correctly the C standard library included with MPW (whose name escapes me at the moment) does have some support beside the standard C library, such as open(), read(), write() and close(). Don’t even think about preemptive threads (or at least, ones you would want to use). In fact, depending on how far back you want to go, you may not have support for what you would not even consider niceties, but were actually nicer than what came before; for instance, before Carbon, a Mac app would call WaitNextEvent() in a loop to sleep until the next event that needed processing, and then the app would have to manually dispatch it to the right target, including switching on the event type, performing hit testing, etc.: no callback-based event handing! But WaitNextEvent() itself did not appear until System 7, if I recall correctly, so if you want to target System 6 and earlier, you have to poll for events while remembering to yield processing time from time to time to drivers, to QuickTime (if you were using it), etc. The same way, if you want to target anything before MacOS 8 you cannot use Navigation Services and instead have to get yourself acquainted with the Standard File Package… FSRefs are not usable before MacOS 9, as another example.

When running in MacOS 9 and earlier, the responsibilities of your code also considerably increase. For instance, you have to be mindful of your memory usage much more than you would have to in Mac OS X, as even when running with virtual memory in MacOS 9 (something many users disabled anyway) your application only has access to a small slice of address space called the memory partition of the application (specified in the 'SIZE' resource and that the user can change): there is only one address space in the system which is partitioned between the running apps; as a result memory fragmentation becomes a much more pressing concern, requiring in practice the use of movable memory blocks and a number of assorted things (move high, locking the block, preallocating master pointers, etc.). Another example is that you must be careful to leave processor time for background apps, even if you are a fullscreen game: otherwise, for instance if iTunes is playing music in the background, it will keep playing (thanks to a trick known as “interrupt time”)… until the end of the track, and become silent from then on. Oh, and did I mention that (at least before Carbon and the Carbon Event Manager) menu handling runs in a closed event handling loop (speaking of interrupt time) that does not yield any processing time to your other tasks? Fun times.

Also, depending again on how far back you want to go, you might have difficulty using the same code in MacOS 9 and Mac OS X, even with Carbon and CarbonLib (the backport of most of the Carbon APIs to MacOS 9 as a library, in order to support the same binary and even the same slice running on both MacOS 9 and Mac OS X). For instance, if you use FSSpec instead of FSRef in order to run on MacOS 8, your app will have issues on Mac OS X with file names longer than were possible on MacOS 9; they are not fatal, but will cause your app to report the file name as something like Thisisaverylongfilena#17678A… not very user-friendly. And the Standard File Package is not supported at all in Carbon, so you will have to split your code at compile time (so that the references to the Standard File Package are not even present when compiling for Carbon) and diverge at runtime so that when running in System 7 the app uses the Standard File Package, and when running in MacOS 8 and later it uses Navigation Services, plus the assorted packaging headaches (e.g. using a solution like FatCarbon to have two slices, one ppc that links to InterfaceLib, the pre-Carbon system library, linking weakly to the Navigation Services symbols, and one ppc that links to CarbonLib and only runs on Mac OS X).

You think I’m done? Of course not, don’t be silly. The runtime environment in MacOS 9 is in general less conductive to development than that of Mac OS X: the lack of memory protection not only means that, when your app crashes, it is safer to just reboot the Mac since it may have corrupted the other applications, but also means you typically do not even know when your code, say, follows a NULL pointer, since that action typically doesn’t fault. Cooperative multitasking also means that a hang from your app hangs the whole Mac (only the pointer is still moving), though that can normally be solved by a good command-alt-escape… after which it’s best to reboot anyway. As for MacsBug, your friendly neighborhood debugger… well, for one, it is disassembly only, no source. But you can handle that, right?

It’s not that bad!

But don’t let these things discourage you from toying with Classic MacOS development! Indeed, doing so is not as bad as you could imagine from the preceding descriptions: none of those things matter when programming trivial, for fun stuff, and even if you program slightly-less-than-trivial stuff, your app will merely require a 128 MB memory partition where it ought to only take 32 MB, which doesn’t matter in this day and age.

And in fact, it is a very interesting exercise because it allows a better understanding of what makes the Macintosh the Macintosh, by seeing how it was originally programmed for. So I encourage you all to try and play with it.

For this, I do have some specific advice about MPW. For one, I remember MrC, the PowerPC compiler, being quite anal-retentive for certain casts, which it just refuses to do implicitly: for instance, the following code will cause an error (not just a warning):

SInt16** sndHand;
sndHand = NewHandle(sampleNb * sizeof(SInt16));

You need to explicitly cast:

SInt16** sndHand;
sndHand = (Sint16**)NewHandle(sampleNb * sizeof(SInt16));

It is less demanding when it comes to simple casts between pointers. Also, even though it makes exactly no difference in PowerPC code, it will check that functions that are supposed to have a pascal attribute (supposed to mark the function as being called using the calling conventions for Pascal, which makes a difference in 68k code), typically callbacks, do have it, and will refuse to compile if this is not the case.

If you go as far back as 68k, if I remember correctly int is 16 bit wide in the Mac 68k environment (this is why SInt32 was long up until 64-bit arrived: in __LP64__ mode SInt32 is int), but became 32 bit wide when ppc arrived, so be careful, it’s better not to use int in general.

QuickDraw is, by some aspects, more approachable that Quartz (e.g. no object to keep track of and deallocate at the end), but on the other hand the Carbon transition added some hoops to jump through that makes it harder to just get started with it; for instance something as basic as getting the black pattern, used to ensure your drawing is a flat color, is described in most docs as using the black global variable, but those docs should have been changed for Carbon: with Carbon GetQDGlobalsBlack(&blackPat); must be used to merely get that value. Another aspect which complicates initial understanding is that pre-Carbon you would just directly cast between a WindowPtr, (C)GrafPtr, offscreen GWorldPtr, etc., but when compiling for Carbon you have to use conversion functions, for instance GetWindowPort() to get the port for a given window… but only for some of those conversions, the others just being done with casts, and it is hard to know at a glance which are which.

When it came to packaging, I think I got an app building for classic MacOS relatively easily with MPW, but when I made it link to CarbonLib I got various issues related to the standard C library, in particular the standard streams (stdin, stdout and stderr), and I think I had to download an updated version of some library or some headers before it would work and I could get a single binary that ran both in MacOS 9 and natively on Mac OS X.

Also, while an empty 'carb' resource with ID 0 does work to mark the application as being carbonized and make it run natively on Mac OS X, you are supposed to instead use a 'plst' resource with ID 0 and put in there what you would put in the Info.plist if the app were in a package. Also, it is not safe to use __i386__ to know whether to use framework includes (#include <Carbon/Carbon.h>) or “flat” includes (#include <Carbon.h>); typically you’d use something like WATEVER_USE_FRAMEWORK_INCLUDES, which you then set in your Makefile depending on the target.

Lastly, don’t make the same mistake I originally did: when an API asks for a Handle, it doesn’t just mean a pointer to pointer to something, it means something that was specifically allocated with NewHandle() (possibly indirectly, e.g. with GetResource() and loaded if necessary), so make sure that is what you give it.

I also have a few practical tips for dealing with Macs running ancient system software (be they physical or emulated). Mac OS X removed support for writing to an HFS (as opposed to HFS+) filesystem starting with Mac OS X 10.6, and HFS is the only thing MacOS 8 and earlier can read. However, you can still for instance write pre-made HFS disk images to floppy discs with Disk Utility (and any emulator worth its salt will allow you to mount disk images inside the emulated system), so your best bet is to use a pre-made image to load some essential tools, then if you can, set up a network connection (either real or emulated) and transfer files that way, making sure to encode them in MacBinary before transfer (which I generally prefer to BinHex); unless you know the transfer method is Mac-friendly the whole way, always decode from MacBinary as the last step, directly from the target. Alternately, you can keep around a Mac running Leopard around to directly write to HFS floppies, as I do.

Okay, exercise time.

If you are cheap, you could get away with only providing a 68k build and a Mac OS X Intel build (except neither of these can run on Leopard running on PowerPC…). So the exercise is to, on the contrary, successfully build the same code (modulo #ifdefs, etc.) for 68k, CFM-PPC linking to InterfaceLib, CFM-PPC linking to CarbonLib, Mach-o Intel, Mach-o 64-bit PPC, and Mach-o 64-bit Intel (a Cocoa UI will be tolerated for those two) for optimal performance everywhere (ARM being excluded here, obviously). Bonus points for Mach-o PPC (all three variants) and CFM-68k. More bonus points for gathering all or at least most of those in a single obese package.

Second exercise: figure out the APIs which were present in System 1.0 and are supported in 64-bit on Mac OS X. It’s a short list, but I know for sure it is not empty.

References

Macintosh C Carbon: besides the old Inside Mac books (most of which can still be found here), this is how I learned Carbon programming back in the day.

Gwynne Raskind presents the Mac toolbox for contemporary audiences in two twin articles, reminding you in particular to never neglect error handling, you can’t get away with it when using the toolbox APIs.

3 thoughts on “MPW on Mac OS X

  1. but only for some of those conversions, the others just being done with casts, and it is hard to know at a glance which are which.

    Could you elaborate? There’s very little that should actually work as though it’s toll-free bridged in the Carbon API — even if it happens to work on OS 9, the app will likely not function on OS X.

    Yeah, it’s nice to have source level-debugging, although gdb was a huge let-down in many ways, and Macsbug was a substantially better assembly-level debugging interface than gdb. lldb is better than gdb, though.

  2. Well, for instance CopyBits() takes two BitMap* as its first two parameters, including when color content is being copied, and even in Mac OS X the supported way to use it with PixMaps is to simply cast the pointers… I remember reading up on Carbon and thinking “OK, contrary to most of the documentation I read on QuickDraw, no implicit conversion or cast allowed, I have to locate and use the correct accessor function for the case at hand”, and I so I use GetGWorldPixMap(), GetWindowPort(), etc. but then I encounter a new case, and I can’t find the accessor function, I look everywhere, until I realize you are supposed to just cast, even on Mac OS X; I can’t remember if it was the CopyBits() case (it has been more than 10 years, and I lost that code unfortunately), but I have remembered the frustration to this day…

  3. These were good days. I became a much better programmer working in the MacOS environment, instead of being abstracted from any sense of the machine my code was running on. I couldn’t just assume I’d been given memory when I asked for it. I had to make sure my pointers were valid and not pointing to memory in someone else’s application address space. I learned to finely tune state machines, and there were callback functions for asynchronous event handling, particularly in network and file system access. But Jobs killed MacOS and spit on the coffin as it was being lowered into the ground, while bringing home a new blonde silicone sister called the NS APIs (and they are still there), and so like all good things, it came to an end.

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