Thank you, Mr. Siracusa

Today, I learned that John Siracusa had retired from his role of writing the review of each new Mac OS X release for Ars Technica. Well, review is not quite the right word: as I’ve previously written when I had the audacity to review one of his reviews, what are ostensibly articles reviewing Mac OS X are, to my mind, better thought of as book-length essays that aim to vulgarize the progress made in each release of Mac OS X. They will be missed.

It would be hard for me to overstate the influence that John Siracusa’s “reviews” have had on my understanding of Mac OS X and on my writing; you only have to see the various references to John or his reviews I made over the years on this blog (including this bit…). In fact, the very existence of this blog was inspired in part by John: when I wrote him with some additional information in reaction to his Mac OS X Snow Leopard review, he concluded his answer with:

You should actually massage your whole email into a blog post [of] your own.  I’d definitely tweet a link to it! 🙂

to which my reaction was:

Blog? Which blog? On the other hand, it’d be a good way to start one
Hmm

Merely 4 months later, for this reason and others, this blog started (I finally managed to drop the information alluded to in 2012; still waiting for that tweet 😉 ).

And I’ll add that his podcasting output may dwarf his blogging in volume, but, besides the fact I don’t listen to podcasts much, I don’t think they really compare, mostly because podcasts lack the reference aspect of his Mac OS X masterpieces due to the inherent limitations of podcasts (not indexed, hard to link to a specific part, not possible to listen in every context, etc.). But, ultimately, it was his call; as someone, if I remember well, commented on the video of this (the actual video has since gone the way of the dodo): “Dear John, no pressure. Love, the Internet”. Let us not mourn, but rather celebrate, from the Mac OS X developer preview write-ups to the Mac OS X 10.10 Yosemite review, the magnum opus he brought to the world. Thank you, Mr. Siracusa.