Various comments on the iPad pro, among other Apple announcements

As someone who regularly expresses himself on how the iPad is (or how it currently falls short of being) the future of computing, I guess I should comment on the announcements Apple made this September, in particular of course the iPad pro. I think it’s great news, of course. But… where to begin? More so than the iPhone, it is software applications, and specifically third-party software, that will make or break the iPad, even more so for the iPad pro, considering that most of its hardware improvements will only really be exploited with third-party apps: it does not appear that Apple will provide a built-in drawing app to go with the impressive tablet drawing capabilities of the iPad pro, for instance.

And so, what corresponding iOS platform news did we get from Apple this September? Err, none. From a policy standpoint, iOS is still as developer-unfriendly, by not supporting software trials for instance, even though this is a fundamental commercial practice; in fact, this appear to be backfiring on Apple, as this resulted in potential buyers going for the already established brands1 when it comes to professional iPad software, and in Apple coming to bringing Adobe and Microsoft on stage in the presentation to prove the professional potential of the iPad pro; those two companies are probably the ones Apple wishes to be least dependent upon, and yet here we are.

And what about iOS, iOS 9 specifically? When it was announced at WWDC, my thoughts were, on the timing: “It’s about time!”, and on the feature set: “This is a good start.”; and this was in the context of the 10′ iPad, so with the iPad pro announcement I was expecting more multitasking features to be announced along with it, but nope, that was it, what I saw at WWDC and thought would be catching up, meant for the then-current iPads, was in fact a stealth preview of software features meant to be sufficient for the iPad pro. Don’t get me wrong, on-screen multitasking on the iPad is awesome (I’ve been playing with it this summer with the developer betas), but the iPad pro will need more than that. Much more, such as, I don’t know, drag and drop between apps? Or a system where one app could ask a service of another other app (bringing it on the screen by the first app’s side if it wasn’t present), similar to extensions except it would better use the screen real estate allowed by the iPad and iPad pro?

So yes, most definitely count me in with those who think Apple is solving only one part of the problem of the iPad platform with the iPad pro. I’m afraid the iPad has too little direct competition for Apple to take this problem seriously right now, and later it may be too late.

All that having been said, I am very impressed with what they’ve shown of the iPad pro’s capabilities as a graphic tablet, even if I will probably never use these capabilities myself; I think Wacom should indeed be worried. One thing that will matter a lot, but Apple hasn’t talked about or posted specs on, is the thinness of the so-called air gap between the screen and the drawing surface, which (along with latency, which they did mention in the keynote) makes all the difference in making the user feel like he is actually drawing on a surface, rather than awkwardly interacting with a machine; Piro of Megatokyo posted about this a while ago. This is something Apple has been good at, at least when compared with other handset/tablet makers. At any rate, the iPad, even the iPad pro, has to support the needs of everyone, so Wacom and other graphic tablet makers may still be able to differentiate themselves by providing possibilities that a tablet that still must support finger input and other usage patterns than drawing could not provide.

Lastly, I am interested in the iPad pro as a comic reader. The 10′ iPad family is generally great for reading manga and U.S. comics, as that screen size is large enough to contain a single page of them (in the case of U.S. comics, pages are actually slightly scaled down, but that does not impair reading), however it falls short when needing to show a double page spread, such as the (outstanding) one found in the latest issue of Princeless (if you’re not, you should be reading Princeless. Trust me.) or the not less outstanding ones found in Girl Genius. The iPad pro has the perfect size and aspect ratio for those, being able of showing two U.S. comics pages side by side at the same scale a 10′ iPad is able of showing a single page. A 10′ iPad is also too small to reasonably display a single page of comics of the French-Belgian tradition (aka “bandes dessinées”), while the iPad pro would be up to the task with only a minor downscale; I’m not about to give up buying my French-Belgian comics on paper any time soon, but it would be a wonderful way to read them for someone overseas who is far away from any store that distributes such comics, especially for less well-known ones.2

As for the other announcements… I don’t know what the new Apple TV will be capable of outside the U.S., so most of its appeal is hard to get for me. I have little to comment on with regard to its capabilities as an app platform, except that I find the notion of Universal iOS/tvOS games (even more so saved game handoff) to be completely ludicrous: the two have completely different interaction mechanisms, so the very notion that the “same game” could be running on both is absurd.

As for the iPhone 6S/6S+, what is to me most interesting about them is 3D touch and live photos. Those two are very dependent on the concept catching on with developers (well, Vine is ready for live photos, of course…): there is little point in being able to capture live photos if you can’t share them as such on Facebook/Flickr/Dropbox/etc., and it remains to be seen which developers will add 3D touch actions to their apps, and what for. So will they catch on? We’ll see.


  1. And they, in turn, have the branding power to pull off alternate payment schemes such as subscriptions, allowing them to thrive on the iPad more than developers dependent on race-to-the-bottom iOS App Store revenue do.
  2. What about double page spreads in French-Belgian comics? Those are rare, but they exist, most notably in the œuvre of Cabu (yes, that Cabu). However, I am not sure the 17′ handheld tablet that would be necessary to properly display these would be very desirable.